9. Emergency department (ED) discharge protocols/procedures for patients presenting with an illicit, accidental drug overdose (OD): Determining evidence-based practice (EBP) interventions and discharge instruction

9. Emergency department (ED) discharge protocols/procedures for patients presenting with an illicit, accidental drug overdose (OD): Determining evidence-based practice (EBP) interventions and discharge instruction

9. Emergency department (ED) discharge protocols/procedures for patients presenting with an illicit, accidental drug overdose (OD): Determining evidence-based practice (EBP) interventions and discharge instruction

Ruthanne Palumbo, DNP, RN, CNE, CARN; UNCW; North Carolina, USA
Nancy Ahern, PhD, RN, CPHQ; UNCW; North Carolina, USA
Amany Bebawy, Quality Management System Manager PhD, RN, CPHQ; New Hanover regional Medical Center-Novant Health; North Carolina, USA
Brandy Mechling, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC; UNCW; North Carolina, USA

Learning objectives:
  1. Identify two gaps in interventions provided to post-OD patients upon discharge.
  2. Discuss the incorporation of appropriate EBP interventions.
  3. Presentation Handout.
  4.  
Abstract:

Data indicate 175 individuals overdose (OD) daily, many of them receiving care in the emergency department (ED). Stigma is often associated with substance use disorder (SUD) and OD and can influence the care and follow-up patients receive. Even after receiving lifesaving interventions, these patients spend an average of fewer than three hours in the ED and often discharged without needed resources. The Health Stigma and Discrimination Framework were used to guide the study. This was a descriptive study using a retrospective chart review of ED visits for illicit OD between January 1, 2020, and December 31, 2020. Data collected included demographics, length of stay, interventions, and discharge instructions provided. Descriptive statistics were examined. There were 242 patients (male= 60%, female= 40%; mean age=35) treated in the ED for accidental OD from an illicit drug. Patients spent an average of 2 hours and 14 minutes in the ED. Naloxone was administered to 70% (n=166) of patients. Only 25% of patients were provided with a prescription for naloxone. Inconsistencies were noted regarding interventions received and discharge information provided. Addictions nurses caring for this population experience are essential in developing and providing consistent evidence-based practice (EBP) interventions and discharge instruction. Research is needed to develop and implement standardized, EBP interventions and discharge instructions; to determine the effect on patient care and foster positive outcomes.

IMPERIAL 6

MEETING ID: 828 2329 0199
PASSWORD: MAPLE22

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