63. Exploring the role of the nurse in opioid use disorder treatment: A focused ethnographic study

63. Exploring the role of the nurse in opioid use disorder treatment: A focused ethnographic study

63. Exploring the role of the nurse in opioid use disorder treatment: A focused ethnographic study

Amie Kerber, RN, BScN, MN Candidate; University of Calgary; Canada

Tam Truong Donnelly, BScN, MSN, PhD; University of Calgary; Canada

Aniela Dela Cruz; University of Calgary; Canada Candace Lind; University of Calgary; Canada

Learning objectives:
  1. Understanding of the complexity of care required by clients experiencing OUD,
  2. Learning how harm reduction principles permeate all aspects of the nurse role, and the importance of expansion of services for OUD treatment.
  3. Presentation Handout.
  4.  
Abstract:

Opioid use disorder (OUD) affects people across the continuum of life, in all geographic locations, irrespective of gender, age, nationality and socioeconomic status. From January to March 2021, 1792 opioid toxicity deaths occurred in Canada. As front-line healthcare professionals, nurses make substantial contributions toward prevention, treatment and management of OUD. However, little research has been conducted regarding the role and impact of the nurses working in these unique practice settings. Using focused ethnography, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the understanding of the role, and impact of the nurse, working in OUD treatment. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with ten registered nurses who worked across the spectrum of OUD treatment, including supervised consumption services, inpatient addiction consult services, and community opioid agonist therapy clinics. Analysis of the qualitative data revealed six primary themes to better understand the role and impact of the nurse: (a) the art of addiction nursing, (b) direct patient care, (c) indirect patient care, (d) the shared experience of stigma, (e) perceived barriers, and (f) looking to the (uncertain) future. The findings from this study can provide a more comprehensive look at how nurses can be utilized to their full scope of practice across a variety of OUD treatment settings. Key learning outcomes include an understanding of the complexity of care required by clients experiencing OUD, how harm reduction principles permeate all aspects of the nurse role, and the importance of expansion of services for OUD treatment.

IMPERIAL 6

MEETING ID: 828 2329 0199
PASSWORD: MAPLE22

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