6. The Booze-Less Drinking Game: Exploring Alcohol Consumption Among Australian Nurses

6. The Booze-Less Drinking Game: Exploring Alcohol Consumption Among Australian Nurses

6. The Booze-Less Drinking Game: Exploring Alcohol Consumption Among Australian Nurses

Adam Searby, RN, PhD; Deakin University; Australia

Learning objectives:
  1. Explore the prevalence of alcohol consumption among Australian nurses, particularly in the context of the global COVID-19 pandemic.
  2. Present potential technology-based interventions for risky alcohol consumption among nurses.
  3. Explore qualitative research that explores the implementation of these interventions, as well as the perception of alcohol consumption, stress and the pandemic.
  4.  
Abstract:

Purpose: Like in many other jurisdictions around the world, nurses make up the majority of the Australian healthcare workforce. Little research attention has been paid to the alcohol consumption patterns of Australian nurses; the purpose of this research project was to explore alcohol consumption among the Australian nursing cohort. Objective (specific aims): 1. To define the prevalence of risky alcohol consumption among Australian nurses 2. To explore subjective experiences of alcohol consumption, and the impact of stress and the pandemic on alcohol consumption 3. To determine whether technology-based interventions for risky alcohol consumption are acceptable to nurses Design and methods: We used a mixed-methods approach to meet the aims of the research project. The first phase of this project used a cross-sectional, online survey to determine the prevalence of risky alcohol consumption among Australian nurses. The second phase used a qualitative, semi-structured interview process to discern the subjective experience of nurses (n=42), including perceptions of stress on alcohol consumption and the acceptability of technology-based interventions. Results: Using the validated Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), we surveyed 1,209 nurses from a wide range of settings across Australia, finding the overall prevalence of risky alcohol consumption at 36.9%: 26.1% at risky or hazardous level, 5.6% at high-risk or harmful level, and 5.1% at high-risk, almost certainly dependent level. Correlations between work setting, perceived stress and alcohol consumption were also found. The qualitative phase found many nurses reporting stress as having an impact on their alcohol consumption. Although we did not set out to determine a correlation between the COVID pandemic and alcohol consumption, many participants described the impact of pandemic related increases in patient presentations, workforce changes and work from home or lockdown orders as having an impact on their alcohol consumption. We used the Behaviour Change Wheel to explore these interviews, specifically the COM-B model, to determine factors for use of a technology-based intervention, finding that nurses had specific requirements for any intervention that warrant targeted interventions. Conclusions: In our sample, a substantial number of nurses were consuming alcohol at risky levels. Our qualitative findings indicate that there are several potential drivers for this, including pandemic driven factors such as increasing workloads and working from home. Our participants also expressed a desire for any technology-based intervention to be tailored to the nursing cohort.

IMPERIAL 4

MEETING ID: 985 5907 9688
PASSWORD: MAPLE22

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