IntNSA eLearning Portal Logo
Search
Close this search box.

32. Interactive Computer Simulation Training for Clinicians in Screening and Brief Intervention for Substance Use Among Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

32. Interactive Computer Simulation Training for Clinicians in Screening and Brief Intervention for Substance Use Among Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

32. Interactive Computer Simulation Training for Clinicians in Screening and Brief Intervention for Substance Use Among Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

Samantha Toomey; University of Michigan School of Nursing; Michigan, USA
Emma La Forest; University of Michigan School of Nursing; Michigan, USA
Jai Ahluwalia; New York Medical College; New York, USA
Rhonda Schultz, BSN, RN; University of Michigan School of Nursing; Michigan, USA
Robert Ploutz-Snyder, PhD, PStat; University of Michigan School of Nursing; Michigan, USA

Learning objectives:
  1. Identify key aspects of the interactive computer simulation, SBI with Adolescents (Kognito).
  2. Describe outcomes (e.g., assessment challenge scores, self-perceived competence and confidence, and qualitative feedback) among a sample of inpatient adolescent psychiatric clinicians who participated in this training.
  3.  
Abstract:

Background and Purpose Adolescent substance use is a leading public health problem in the United States which often goes unidentified and untreated, with serious, negative consequences. Adolescent screening and brief intervention (SBI) is an evidence-based approach to prevention and early intervention for potential or current substance use. This feasibility study used an interactive computer simulation to teach SBI to a team of interprofessional clinicians on an inpatient adolescent psychiatric unit at a major university hospital. Design and Methods Participants (n = 56) completed the virtual training SBI with Adolescents (Kognito). The clinicians final assessment challenges” were analyzed to determine the percentage of participants who received a passing score of >75 on their first attempt. We analyzed two data sets, one depicting data from before clinicians completed the simulation training, and one following completion. We used these data to assess for changes in self-perceived competence and confidence regarding SBI delivery. Results Post-training data showed that 51 of 56 (91%) clinicians who completed the training achieved a passing score on their first attempt with the final assessment challenge. We found increases in both self-perceived competence and confidence, with p-values < 0.01. We received positive qualitative feedback from clinicians regarding their experiences with the training. Conclusion SBI with Adolescents was found to be a feasible educational tool to increase inpatient adolescent psychiatric clinicians skills for delivering SBI. Practical Implications This project demonstrated support for the potential benefits of using an interactive computer simulation to teach SBI to clinicians on an inpatient adolescent psychiatric unit.

IMPERIAL 4

MEETING ID: 985 5907 9688
PASSWORD: MAPLE22

Leave your thought here

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *